1. new-aesthetic:

    Riding with the Stars: Passenger Privacy in the NYC Taxicab Dataset – Research

    There has been a lot of online comment recently about a dataset released by the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission. It contains details about every taxi ride (yellow cabs) in New York in 2013, including the pickup and drop off times, locations, fare and tip amounts, as well as anonymized (hashed) versions of the taxi’s license and medallion numbers. It was obtained via a FOIL (Freedom of Information Law) request earlier this year and has been making waves in the hacker community ever since. […] First things first. How might I track a person? Well, to zone in on a particular trip, I can use any combination of known characteristics that appear in the dataset, such as the pickup or drop-off coordinates or datetime, the medallion or license number, or even the fare amount from a receipt. Being the avid fanboy that I am (note: sarcasm), I thought it might be interesting to find out something new about some of the celebrities who had been seen in New York in 2013. In particular, where did they go to / come from, and how much did they tip? In order to do this, I spent some of the most riveting hours of my professional career searching through images of “celebrities in taxis in Manhattan in 2013″ to find enough information to identify the correct record in the database. I had some success – combining the below photos of Bradley Cooper and Jessica Alba with some information from celebrity gossip blogs allowed me to find their trips, which are shown in the accompanying maps.
     

  2. new-aesthetic:

    NBA 2K15: Face scan an early issue with US release of basketball game - Gaming - Gadgets and Tech - The Independent

    NBA 2K15 was released stateside today and the wildly popular basketball series already has fans in a spin. Reviews have been massively positive so far but gamers have been experiencing a bit of an issue with one feature in particular: the face scan. Like never before, the game is promising to put you in the thick of the action, with the next-gen technology promising to lift your face into the ever-popular MyCareer mode for an even more realistic experience. But early results have been… mixed.
     

  3. visual-poetry:

    »text-context« by joseph kosuth (+)

     

  4. (Source: rhizomedotorg)

     

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  6. new-aesthetic:

    "Facebook profile information that is publicly visible by default, for the first five years of the service" via What Is Public? — The Message — Medium

    Programmers and engineers who create software with controls for privacy have moved in recent years to an on/off model where content is either viewable to the entire world or only to a list of people whom a user identifies as “friends”. Obviously, reducing public status to a binary consideration is convenient for a medium where everything must ultimately be represented in binary code. But we can’t let society’s norms be defined by which features are least expensive for storing on a database server in the cloud.
     

  7. visual-poetry:

    »working on my novel« by cory arcangel

    working on my novel is a book which is based on a twitter feed that re-tweets the best posts featuring the phrase “working on my novel.”

    pre-order it here

     


  8. We’ve seen some less-radical attempts to destroy technology in the real world in recent months, mainly in the form of attacks on people wearing Glass or flying drones, or the drone on its own (by hockey fans who reportedly and incorrectly thought it belonged to the LAPD). As in the movie, the destroyers haven’t been identified or punished, with one exception: Andrea Mears, 23, was charged with third degree assault for attacking a teen boy, Austin Haughwout, 17, flying a drone on a Connecticut beach. She got probation this week, as noted by comprehensive drone chronicler Greg McNeal. It’s easy to call these people Luddites, after the British workers who set about destroying machines — and in some cases killing the people who owned them — in the late 1700s and early 1800s in a futile attempt to turn back the tide of mechanization. It led Britain to pass a law making machine-wrecking punishable by death. But the new machine destroyers’ motivations are different. The original Luddites were worried machines would take their jobs; the Neo-Luddites fear machines will steal their privacy.
     


  9. So, what’s the trade-off here? In general, we are safer (automation makes airline flying safer, in general) except in the long-tail: pilots are losing both tacit knowledge of flying and some of its mechanics. But in general, we, as humans, have less and less understanding of our machines—we are compartmentalized, looking at a tiny corner of a very complex system beyond our individual comprehension. Increasing numbers of our systems—from finance to electricity to cybersecurity to medical systems, are going in this direction. We are losing control and understanding which seems fine—until it’s not. We will certainly, and unfortunately, find out what this really means because sooner or later, one of these systems will fail in a way we don’t understand.
     

  10. yearoftheglitch:

    Phillip Stearns

    Hito Steyerl: Is the Internet úäCì@?ù.1HcpiÙîfê¿Dead, 2014 (Unglitched), 2014

    Text, which Hito Steyerl inserted into the data of an image of a print by Utamaro, was manually found and deleted, restoring the original digital file.

    Source

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